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My Netduino CNC Machine


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#21 japerr

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 04:49 PM

Thanks japerr for awakening the CNC Studio project. You're the first one to show some interest so I'm glad to help you guys. For the startup, I will try to fix some bugs in a week then do a check-in to SVN on CodePlex.

By the way, there is also a WP7 version of CNC Studio but unfortunatelly CNC server is currently down.
http://www.windowsph...6b-78e7d1fa76f8


It would be great to be able to download a file from Thingiverse, hook your phone up to a CNC and have it produce something. Perhaps this would be a couple of years out.

#22 Darrin

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 03:28 PM

The X, Y and Z axes, the gantry and the base are now built and assembled! Next step is a spindle holder.

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#23 papnkukn

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 08:24 PM

As promised CNC Studio has been updated and source code checked-in. Please, implement the methods in NetduinoDriver.cs according to your needs.

It would be great to be able to download a file from Thingiverse, hook your phone up to a CNC and have it produce something. Perhaps this would be a couple of years out.

It's interesting, idea goes on the list. But at first the basic functionality needs be fully implemented and brushed out.

The X, Y and Z axes, the gantry and the base are now built and assembled! Next step is a spindle holder.

Looks precisely measured and aligned. Do the small motors have enough torque to turn the axis on the other end?

#24 Darrin

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 09:00 PM

As promised CNC Studio has been updated and source code checked-in. Please, implement the methods in NetduinoDriver.cs according to your needs.


I'll check that out, thanks!

Looks precisely measured and aligned. Do the small motors have enough torque to turn the axis on the other end?


Yes the steppers are doing a great job at driving all 3 Axes. I get about 60 Inches per minute for rapids and I'm cutting between 10 and 30 IPM depending on the tool and material.

#25 Johan

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 10:51 AM

What a beautiful project. I'm an engineer and love CNC machines. I want to have one for myself and build this. Looks fantastic. The second thing I want is a 3D printer. Like: http://reprap.org/wiki/Main_Page Maybe those things can be combined to the ultimate homebrew creation machine. Another future idea is to add two more extra axis. Then it's possible to make undercuts. Then you don't have to remove the product and recalibrate to add extra features. Easy for me to say, but my programming skill isn't high enough to see the consequences in the programming.

#26 Darrin

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 12:42 AM

Making more progress: The dremel is mounted and I've made a hold-down table using T-Slot which I've channeled underneath a spoil board made from plastic. I'm now starting to replace my sloppy hand-made parts with precision CNC made parts. Here are a few photos. The Software is maturing nicely as well, and can perform drilling cycles, cut helix patterns for boring large holes and reads most standard g-code (which I'm currently producing from CAM-BAM). I'll post the code (both Windows and Netduino code) soon for those interested in using it.

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#27 Scott Green

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 09:25 PM

Darrin, Looking great! Love the e-stop button... Scott...

#28 James Maeding

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 02:45 AM

Hey, this looks awesome.. and it's written in c# too from what I can gather. Thanks for the link, this could integrate nicely with the motion control software I've written!


wow, so excited to see a netduino based cnc.
I am a civil engineer and write software for designing, producing plans, and making 3d models in autocad.
I have actually written my software to run on a cheap clone, bricscad, but essentially I have all kinds of geometric functions written in c# that could be useful to you guys.
I want to make a 3 axis cnc that has feedback on positioning. So we could make a sensor that counts turns of the lead screws, and feeds back position so often, checking if we are where we should be.
We could also add many cool things like manual jogging and arbitrary zeroing in space.

Autocad has a .net API, so I could even have it show where the tool was as the cutting happens.
I guess the biggest thing is a USB based controller with code done in C#.
And you guys have written the g code parser! whoo-hooo, kid in a candy store here.

I even have tools that let .net talk to a language called autolisp that acad uses. This will be neat as there is an autodesk developer network leader named Kean Walmsley that does the Through the Interface blog.
He has interest in using .net with information providing devices to do things in acad.
Lots of talent out there to hook up with this so thanks for sharing your work so far!

#29 James Maeding

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 04:31 PM

Darrin, anytime you can post the code is appreciated. I'd like to start learning G code better so I can make a simulator in autocad. If anyone ever needs help with Autocad, its what I do for a living, so happy to help (for free...). I'd like to further Darrin's work though, not make my own parser.

#30 Darrin

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 08:58 PM

Darrin, anytime you can post the code is appreciated.
I'd like to start learning G code better so I can make a simulator in autocad.
If anyone ever needs help with Autocad, its what I do for a living, so happy to help (for free...).
I'd like to further Darrin's work though, not make my own parser.


Thanks for your comments James, I'm happy to go ahead and post the code. I've wanted to setup a source code repository for it but haven't had the time so I'll just post the zipped up projects with this reply.

This code is a work-in-progress, and so the usual disclaimers apply. Anyone who downloads this is free to use it and learn from it, but please let me know and give me credit in the comments if you decide to use it in any derivative works.

There are two solutions, each in their own zip. DazCAM.zip is the Netduino code that drives the steppers using commands sent from the DazCamUI.zip solution. The UI is responsible for managing settings, parsing g-code and keeping track of the machine's current location in order to send the correct number of step and direction signals to the Netduino code.

If you have any questions, let me know!

Cheers

Edited 6/18/2012
This code was outdated, so I've removed it and posted the latest version to the end of this thread.

#31 James Maeding

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 07:03 PM

Thanks for your comments James, I'm happy to go ahead and post the code. I've wanted to setup a source code repository for it but haven't had the time so I'll just post the zipped up projects with this reply.

If you have any questions, let me know!

Cheers


Right on, can't wait to get into it.
Thanks a bunch.

#32 James Maeding

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 09:55 PM

Thanks for your comments James, I'm happy to go ahead and post the code.

If you have any questions, let me know!

Cheers


Darrin, that is a lot of code you have done.
I think this is a huge step for the arduino/netduino community.
The electronics part of CNC is the most expensive, and most proprietary it seems.
To fill that gap with a $35 device that works on USB and C# is unreal.
Maybe you only post a free version of the code, then refine it and sell the version that has acceleration or whatever additional in it. You deserve some hobby money in return somehow.

#33 Darrin

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 02:34 AM

Darrin, that is a lot of code you have done.
I think this is a huge step for the arduino/netduino community.
The electronics part of CNC is the most expensive, and most proprietary it seems.
To fill that gap with a $35 device that works on USB and C# is unreal.
Maybe you only post a free version of the code, then refine it and sell the version that has acceleration or whatever additional in it. You deserve some hobby money in return somehow.


Thanks, I hope you get some good use from the code. I'm happy to share with other hobby enthusiasts! :)

Maybe one day I'll post it as "donation ware" for those who use it and would like to see it improved.

#34 Chris Walker

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 04:26 AM

I so want one of these! I wish I had a garage! :D Chris

#35 Darrin

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 04:30 AM

I so want one of these! I wish I had a garage! :D

Chris


Right now, so does my wife! Hah! :)

#36 Michel Trahan

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 04:50 PM

I so want one of these! I wish I had a garage! :D

Chris

Join the club ;) lol
Started with C in 1985, moved to Vb3 ... to vb6 and stopped. Now started with .Net and learning C# and VB.net and wishing VB.net was on MF !

#37 Dan Morphis

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 07:47 PM

Darrin, anytime you can post the code is appreciated.
I'd like to start learning G code better so I can make a simulator in autocad.
If anyone ever needs help with Autocad, its what I do for a living, so happy to help (for free...).
I'd like to further Darrin's work though, not make my own parser.


Where were you on Sunday night when I was battling AutoCAD :-) I actually ended up writing a craplet to spit out some g code to do what I needed (drill a hole every .5 inches along the x and y axis in a 12"x12" board. 3-4 hours with AutoCAD, and nothing (I'm an AutoCAD newbie), and 5 mins with some code and done :-)

The whole point of my exercise was to build the top piece of the vacuum hold-down table for my CNC machine :-)

-dan

#38 Michel Trahan

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Posted 16 December 2011 - 01:04 AM

I actually ended up writing a craplet to spit out some g code to do what I needed (drill a hole every .5 inches along the x and y axis in a 12"x12" board.
-dan

I was learning AUTOCAD 2012 and switch to INVENTOR 2012, and doing what you need takes about 3 minutes ... you should look into it !
Started with C in 1985, moved to Vb3 ... to vb6 and stopped. Now started with .Net and learning C# and VB.net and wishing VB.net was on MF !

#39 netduinonube

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Posted 16 December 2011 - 01:18 AM

I so want one of these! I wish I had a garage! :D

Chris


Lol, I just finish building a CNC machine in my living room :) and I live in a one bedroom flat (with a very understanding wife).

Just want to say a BIG THANK YOU to everyone who is working on the awesome code, I am currently using an Arduino, and it is really limited :( I can't wait to rebuild the machine with my beloved Netduino.

PS. Before anyone asks, Yes my CNC is made from bits of IKEA furniture "bargain corner". It turned out surprisingly accurate, especially since I have only spent £90 and that includes the cheap Dremel clone.

Keep up the good work!!! :D

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#40 Dan Morphis

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Posted 16 December 2011 - 06:36 PM

Lol, I just finish building a CNC machine in my living room :) and I live in a one bedroom flat (with a very understanding wife).

Just want to say a BIG THANK YOU to everyone who is working on the awesome code, I am currently using an Arduino, and it is really limited :( I can't wait to rebuild the machine with my beloved Netduino.

PS. Before anyone asks, Yes my CNC is made from bits of IKEA furniture "bargain corner". It turned out surprisingly accurate, especially since I have only spent £90 and that includes the cheap Dremel clone.

Keep up the good work!!! :D


Where did you pickup your linear guides at? Are you using acme screws or all thread? Do you use anti-backlash nuts, or program out the backlash?

-dan




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