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Introducing Netduino Go


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#21 Mattster

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:24 PM

Awesome (he mutters as he shuffles off to find the Visa card ...)

#22 Pete Brown

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:29 PM

That's the good thing of IO virtualisation; every module could, in theory, contain as many analog inputs as you want. For example the shield base module has 6 analog inputs.
Also, since the analog value is read out on the module itself, and from that point translated over a digital layer, you won't be bothered by the resistance of the cable to the Netduino Go! nor other influences from outside.


Ahh ok. So if I understand this correctly, the analog capabilites of the main board don't come into play. It's all on the remote "smart" module. Interesting.

In my mind, I'm seeing a fair bit of logic out on those modules. Is there an in-field update mechanism that is end-user friendly?

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Pete Brown - http://10rem.net (NETMF, C++, Windows, C64, and general geekery) Twitter: @pete_brown
I work for Microsoft. Opinions expressed here are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of my employer,our partners or customers.

#23 Stefan

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:32 PM

Can I virtualize outputs? Lets say I want to drive an 8x8 grid of leds - can I generate 64 outputs somehow? (Noob question , I'm sure)

If you build your module, and you use a chip that can handle 64 outputs, you'll be just fine!
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#24 Stefan

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:34 PM

Ahh ok. So if I understand this correctly, the analog capabilites of the main board don't come into play. It's all on the remote "smart" module. Interesting.

You're understanding this correctly. I strongly believe this is a big thing.
Every module gets it's own "co-processor" taking care of very specific tasks, and then communicates with the main board. So the speed of the main board isn't even that relevant anymore.

In my mind, I'm seeing a fair bit of logic out on those modules. Is there an in-field update mechanism that is end-user friendly?

There's an update mechanism on the socket connector, as I demonstrated in this thread.
Eventually there will be software that can flash firmware of modules over the Netduino Go! board (so using just your Netduino Go! board and a Micro USB cable)
"Fact that I'm a moderator doesn't make me an expert in things." Stefan, the eternal newb!
My .NETMF projects: .NETMF Toolbox / Gadgeteer Light / Some PCB designs

#25 Roy Salisbury

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:38 PM

I found a few more "go" related items on your partner web sites (had to go to all 3 to get everything). I found some stacking modules and and IDC cable breakout board. I think I have ordered everything available now. :)

#26 CW2

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:49 PM

Lets say I want to drive an 8x8 grid of leds - can I generate 64 outputs somehow?

Using multiplexing (matrix) will require just 16 outputs (8 rows + 8 columns), Charlieplexing even less (9 pins can drive 9*(9-1) = 72 LEDs). However, the LED maximum peak current can be an issue Posted Image

#27 Daniel B.

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 08:27 PM

Congratulations! I love how easy you are making prototyping for those who are a bit intimidated and/or overwhelmed by custom wiring, soldering, etc. I hope it helps pull in more creative minds that have have good ideas, but had been unsure of how to prototype them. The questions I have is whether you'll be giving us upgraded versions of the Netduino Mini/Std/Plus to give those the better speed, code space, and ram? The most important to me would be the mini since I would use that in a finished product, and I would want the same resources I'd been prototyping with available to my finished product. Thanks again for the great products. I can't wait to try out a Netduino Go!

#28 swestcott

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 10:19 PM

This is sweet I have my order placed I am looking forward to having some fun with this thing :)

#29 Russell Christensen

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 04:04 AM

I just wanted to post here and let you know that the moment I saw this board I ordered one! I have been doing some Arduino work for a client and have really gotten into the hardware, but I am a huge .net person so this fit the bill. I actually intended to order the Netduino basic board but this seemed more up my alley! Thanks for all your hard work putting this together! (One simple (ha!) request, any chance at a USB Host with Usb Serial support? :)

#30 Mike L

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 04:34 AM

Great looking product! Congrats on the release! I was wondering what kind of distance can the modules be from the Netduino Go?

#31 PenZenMaster

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 06:09 AM

Chris, This is an outstanding accomplishment. I must say that all of the "old" robots in the shop, you know the ones that are just based on the Netduino, are feeling a bit jealous and perhaps a bit insecure. But still hardy congratulations to you and everyone who contributed to bring this to market. Strangest thing has happened. I tried to order a Go and my order kept getting cancelled. It wasn't until I shut down my WAP that the order stuck. Hey, wait a minute... No, couldn't be could it? I mean robots don't have feelings do they? I was just kidding about the jealousy and insecurity. Seriously, my old robots couldn't have keylogged me and gotten my VISA number and password. No there wouldn't be enough computing power unless they were all linked together on some kind of a wireless mesh......
If it isn't autonomous, it is just an ROV.

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#32 nakchak

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 07:27 AM

This is awesome, cant wait to get one :D Should also make board design somewhat easier rather than having to deal with the annoying arduino header spacing. One question did JTAG headers make it into the board layout?

#33 georgejh

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 07:47 AM

Simply - brilliant!

#34 mtylerjr

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 08:28 AM

This is awesome, cant wait to get one :D

Should also make board design somewhat easier rather than having to deal with the annoying arduino header spacing.

One question did JTAG headers make it into the board layout?



Im no authority, but it looks like from the .BRD that J10, just to the right of the big button in the middle, is for the mini-Jtag header. From the picture, it looks like just the 10 pads are there, that they didnt populate a jtag header for production units (which makes sense) but it should be easy to solder one on... Maybe they will give us some advice as to what tools they used to debug. The spec says:

"Serial wire JTAG debug port (SWJ-DP)
The ARM SWJ-DP interface is embedded, and is a combined JTAG and serial wire debug
port that enables either a serial wire debug or a JTAG probe to be connected to the target.
Debug is performed using 2 pins only instead of 5 required by the JTAG (JTAG pins could be
re-use as GPIO with alternate function): the JTAG TMS and TCK pins are shared with
SWDIO and SWCLK, respectively, and a specific sequence on the TMS pin is used to switch
between JTAG-DP and SW-DP.

Embedded Trace Macrocell™
The ARM Embedded Trace Macrocell provides a greater visibility of the instruction and data
flow inside the CPU core by streaming compressed data at a very high rate from the
STM32F40x through a small number of ETM pins to an external hardware trace port
analyzer (TPA) device. The TPA is connected to a host computer using USB, Ethernet, or
any other high-speed channel. Real-time instruction and data flow activity can be recorded
and then formatted for display on the host computer that runs the debugger software. TPA
hardware is commercially available from common development tool vendors.
The Embedded Trace Macrocell operates with third party debugger software tools."

#35 Fred

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 09:28 AM

I was just about to moan about electronics pricing, UK taxes, etc. and say that the $50 board had become £83 (= $130) in the UK. Then I realised that the price I was looking at was for a "Netduino Go Starter Kit" and included a few modules, so it's not so bad. For anyone UK based SK Pang have them listed as coming soon.

#36 Fred

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 09:44 AM

I'm intrigued by the go!bus idea, but have some reservations. All of which may turn out to be nothing once I tinker with the final product. As someone who DOES like to get out the soldering iron, the extra layer of abstraction concerns me. I can see how it's great for some things (e.g. displays) but the fact the the button module has even become a module with an IC on board (HC589A shift register?) seems over the top. I'm hoping you can add a button just as a button like you used to in the good old Netduino/Plus days. Of course I'm just thinking out loud here. The fact that there's a JTAG header on the board makes me think that Secret Labs has both the scared-of-a-soldering-iron and the more in-depth end of the scale covered. Update: A quick look at the schematic for the go main board shows that each socket has one individual GPIO. Each pair of 4 sockets shares UART and SPI. I'd guess that you can still use the GPIO as before and probably use the UART and SPI as 5 more standard GPIOs if you wanted too, much the same as you can on the Standard/Plus.

#37 Geancarlo2

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 09:50 AM

Liking it so far, although I have to agree with Fred to a certain degree. When are full specifications coming(module/protocol and such)?

#38 emg

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 12:26 PM

Does the Go have to be powered via the USB?

#39 cerver

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 02:14 PM

i would be really interested in a analogue multiplexer board so hopefully that will be in development. one thing that is not clear to me is how does simple analogue/digital inputs work now. do i have to get the base module to still use simple pots, force flex, light sensors and other analogue/digital input devices that are wired up on a bread board? if so it looks like i can add more than 1 base module which means i can control multiple sets of "old school" boards from a single controller and program.

#40 cerver

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 02:38 PM

also the board support S U X modules, so i would assume any of the FEZ modules that work on S U or X would work?




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